Bored of being in virtual reality by yourself? Ask a friend to join with these easy-to-play Chrome-enabled experiences.

Virtual reality is still a relatively nascent technology that's yet to really storm the mainstream. As a result, it's not in everyone's home the way, say, a television set or a desktop computer might be. But as long as one of you has a virtual reality headset you can put to use, there are a couple of web-enabled virtual reality experiments you can play together to help pass the time until both of you are equipped with the proper headgear.

The particular experiments featured here are all showcased on Google's WebVR experiments page, which were recently made available to the public awhile back. As such, they've been properly vetted and optimized to work inside the Chrome browser with WebVR, whether you're using the desktop version of the mobile version. As long as you have at the very least a Daydream View in your possession, you can easily hop into any of these virtual experiences with a friend by your side.

The Musical Forest

Feel like making music together? You can get silly and weird in The Musical Forest, which lets you tap on random shapes in a millennial pink colored forest to make a melody. The experiment works in real time across a variety of platforms; you can access The Musical Forest through the Chrome browser in 360-degree mode, or with a Google Cardboard. Make sure that your corral logs in at the same time, however, so that there's actual synergy between your new virtual jamboree band.

This WebVR experiment works with your friends who have an HTC Vive, too. They can actually add additional shapes with differing melodies to the forest.

Go to The Musical Forest

Konterball

Who doesn't love a fierce game of ping-pong? Unfortunately, not all of us have room for an actual ping-pong table in our household, but that's where virtual reality comes in. Konterball isn't ping-pong. however — it's a game merely based on the mechanics of ping-pong, nbut it offers the same satisfying pop sounds when you tap the ball, just like the real life ping-pong does. The game is exceptionally easy to set up as long as both you and your friend are on the same network. One of them can even play you through the Chrome desktop browser while you play via virtual reality.

Note that Konterball requires Daydream View to play as it prompts you to pop in your headset, but you don't actually use the remote to control the ball. The game simply requires that you move your head in the direction of the ball and then snap your head a bit to hit it across the table. I tried to get the game to work with Cardboard, which is how I originally tried it at Google I/O, but no dice.

Go to Konterball

Spot-the-Bot

Not only do Spot-the-Bot require a friend to play, but the two of you better have healthy communication skills. This game forces plenty of bonding time as the two of you work in tandem to effectively spot the robot in the game. One player users their phone or computer browser to help describe the robot while the other takes the charge in virtual reality to find the foe. Each of the robots come swinging by you on a virtual track, however, so the player with the headset on will have to efficiently multitask. The robots become more complex as you progress further in the game.

This experiment is compatible with Daydream View, the HTC Vice, and the Oculus Rift.

Go to Spot-the-bot